LinkedIn for the #SAsearch

There is a high possibility that you are currently job searching in higher education OR you will be job searching at some point in your life. Because of this, you need to have an updated LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn can help in many ways. If you are job searching, the hiring manager and other people interviewing you will probably Google you during the search, make sure they find accurate information by providing it yourself on LinkedIn.Maximize your job search with Linked In

Additionally, job searchers should use the LinkedIn feature to be anonymous and look up the profiles of staff at the institution before interviews. I did this during my last job search and it was tremendously helpful to know background information and previous jobs of the individuals interviewing me. Prepping for day-long interviews is stressful and overwhelming but LinkedIn definitely makes the process easier. Here’s are some LinkedIn profile tips to make sure you do:

  • Use a professional photo, not a cropped one. Ask a friend to take a photo of you if you need a LinkedIn headshot.
  • Update your profile with positions you have held (the experience section). A description or bullet points is not necessary but the more information you provide, the better.
  • Write a summary – this is a way to introduce yourself to others at the beginning of your profile and say whatever you want to say about your interests! I used Joe Ginese’s advice about storytelling when preparing mine, thanks Joe!
  • Ask your previous supervisors or colleagues to recommend you, and pay it forward by recommending individuals that impressed you with their products or services. Recommendations add value to your profile and really show your worth.
  • Join groups related to your professional area. This is a great way to stay updated on new ideas and ask questions of others working in similar positions. These groups are also often used to share job postings.

A few other tips

  • Personalize the message when connecting with people, especially if it is someone you have never met – why should they connect with you?
  • Take advantage of the “Find Alumni” feature, a great way to reach out to alumni and connect with them, especially if they are doing what you want to be doing. (Thanks for the tip, Amber!)
  • Only connect with people you know. I’m torn on this one. I have not followed this advice and usually accept every invitation I receive. The flip side is when someone asks me “How do you know so-and-so or will you connect me with so-and-so” and I have to say, oh I really don’t know them.

Updating your LinkedIn profile is free and something that can be tremendously beneficial for your career. Set aside 1-2 hours and get your profile started up today! I’ve heard various grumblings that “LinkedIn is pointless” or “there is no reason to have a LinkedIn profile”. My question to the naysayers is, how will it hurt you? Drop that attitude today and take charge of your professional presence!

What are some other tips for using LinkedIn in higher education or student affairs? Has LinkedIn helped you be successful in a job search? Make sure to connect with me on LinkedIn and lets continue the conversation. Good luck in your current or future job search.

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Tips for the Job Search

Job searching in Higher Education

Looking for a job in higher education is time-intensive, stressful, and incredibly complicated. After months of resume tweaks, cover letter writing, anxious waiting, more waiting, phone interviews, Skype interviews, and job interviews, I found the perfect job for me. Preparation and patience led me to a position at an institution I wanted to work at, a functional area I wanted to be in, and the geographical area that was my first choice. The more intentional and prepared you are for your job search, the more successful you will be. While each individual search has it’s own challenges, there are ways to set yourself up for success in your search. As I learned, searching can be especially stressful and tough for graduate students entering the field for the first time. Here are my top tips to consider if you are job searching in higher education:

  • Little details first. Update your resume. Ask others to look over it. Tailor your resume and cover letter to each position. Triple-check spelling and grammar.
  • Stay organized! Keep track of applications you are working on or have submitted. Use this google spreadsheet to track your applications if you want. Just go to “file – make a copy” to start a new one.
  • Prioritize. Think about functional area, location, and institutional type. What is most important to you? How long are you willing to wait for the job you want? Create a matrix to manage competing priorities. This is a great way to map out each month and eliminate stress during the waiting game or beginning months. Patrick Love explained how to do this in a video on his blog. I used this technique for my job search and stayed focused on my priorities. I knew when I was going to start looking outside of my preferred functional area, location, etc. and followed this plan to keep on track.
  • Ask for advice. Talk to mentors, friends, and colleagues about your job search. Ask individuals you trust to read your resume and provide feedback. Get feedback on a cover letter. Hold informational interviews with mentors or professionals at your institution to discuss your future and your career path. Ask people you know through Twitter for help; one person I found incredibly helpful was Mallory Bower. Everyone has an opinion about resumes, cover letters, interview etiquette, etc. I chose to collect as much information as possible and then decide for myself what I believed was best. I often heard contradictory opinions, but it was helpful to hear all the different perspectives and then make an educated decision about what was best for me.
  • Manage your digital presence. Google yourself and see what shows up because I guarantee people are going to be googling you. Create a LinkedIn profile if you don’t already have one and make sure it is updated with a professional headshot and accurate information. LinkedIn is an easy and free way to share your professional accomplishments online.
  • Engage your network. Make sure your contacts, friends, and colleagues know that you are searching. Tell them when you apply for jobs near them, at their alma mater, at institutions where they used to work, or at institutions where they are currently employed. This is very important, because hiring managers are getting numerous applications and others that know you and can vouch for you will help you move forward.

What would you add to this list? What helped you have a successful job search? If you are currently searching I hope this was helpful and good luck! Don’t give up! (wise words from Jimmy V)

PS – I enjoy reviewing and offering feedback on resumes and cover letters. If you’re interested, email me a copy of yours and I will be happy to provide feedback.

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“Love it for a minute”

Recently I was involved in conversations with staff members about some program recommendations from a class project. The staff mentioned to us that if they brought our new ideas up to their direct reports those individuals would immediately point out the negatives.

Do not be that person.

Use the same motto that I tell my students to use when faced with something new. “Love it for a minute”. Change is hard, everywhere, but especially in higher education. Next time you get a proposal or suggestion from students or colleagues, make sure you give it full consideration and list the positives before thinking about the negatives.

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Community standards for technology use

Article that inspired this blog post: Should students be allowed to use smartphones in the classroom?

Picture of iPads in ClassroomOne of the trends I noticed throughout my time in college was how some teachers prohibited use of electronic devices, including computers, in the classroom. It was a pretty standard statement on most syllabi. As time went on it and laptops became more prevalent some teachers started to allow their use in class. In my graduate school program currently there is probably not a day in class that you will not see the majority of the students with laptops on the table.

Last week I wrote about assumptions people when they see others on mobile devices and this week I want to make a suggestion for mobile devices in the classroom and technology-use guidelines. Whether you are a faculty member or student organization advisor you could try using collaborative methods for creating technology guidelines. I have not had a chance to try this personally in the student organization I advise, but I think it would be an improvement from the blanket statement “no technology allowed” that currently governs the organization meetings. At the beginning of the year I would like to give the student leaders the opportunity to determine their guidelines.

I am interested to observe what guidelines students/participants will decide are acceptable through a collaborative method. I noticed in the document from Simon Bates and Alison Lister at the University of British Columbia that students decided mobile phones could be used as class aids. I think that is a great policy! According to the ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and IT, 74% of students reported that smartphone use in class is either banned or discouraged. If we all collectively agree to stop judging mobile phone use, maybe they will become universally acceptable in the classroom.

Another interesting note in the community standard document that Dr. Chris Linder pointed out was that students decided it was acceptable for students to leave class to answer a phone call from a potential employer. Do you feel like that is an acceptable reason to interrupt class?

Lastly, if your student org/classroom expectations allow for computers and tablets but not smartphones my question for you to think about is -Why?- What is the difference between an iPad and an iPhone? Or an Android vs a Tablet vs a Computer? If you allow tablets but not phones, you could be prohibiting access for students that are less-economically advantaged. The student that owns a smartphone but can not afford an iPad can typically do the same things on their phone as a on a tablet. I know this post does not address issues of access for students that may not have smartphones, tablets, or laptops but I wanted to get a conversation started. According the the ECAR report, 89% of students surveyed own a laptop (9 out of 10) and 76% own a smartphone. More statistics about device ownership can be found in the report (starting on page 22).

Lately I have been thinking a lot about technology guidelines and the Pedagogy Unbound article got me thinking about how policies could be changed to improve student success. I want to try the collaborative method with the next student organization I advise. How do you think technology-use guidelines should be created?

[photo credit]

Dahlstrom, Eden, J.D. Walker, and Charles Dziuban, with a foreward by Glenda Morgan. ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2013 (Research Report). Louisville, CO: EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research, September 2013, available from https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdf